Posts tagged guild hall

Robert Longo: Creating Art From Dust

By the turn of the 21st century, Robert Longo was, as he puts it, sitting at the top of the junk pile.

He had once been a leading protagonist in the “Pictures Generation.” Alongside fellow artists like Cindy Sherman, Richard Prince, Louise Lawler and David Salle, he became one of the most collected, exhibited and talked about visionaries of the early 1980s, rising to prominence during the golden age of contemporary art through his “Men in the Cities” series, which depicted suited, dancing silhouettes drawn in charcoal.

But he was punished for it — and cast aside.

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Alexis Rockman’s ‘Shipwrecks’ Reaches New Depths

When Alexis Rockman considers the world’s waterways, he sees them as a network — a transport system that has carried all facets of human history.

From language, culture, art, food, architecture and religion to the more nefarious — such as disease, warfare and pollution — each can be traced back to historic ships.

And, in some cases, notorious shipwrecks.

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The Horizon Is Not A Straight Line: Artist Karin Waisman Finds New Meaning

When Karin Waisman contemplated the sentence, “The horizon is not a straight line,” two years ago, it held different meaning.

It referred to an open-ended future, an uncertain life full of twists and turns. In her own, that has included earning her architecture degree in her native Argentina and, in an effort to follow her passion, moving to the United States to study art at Cornell University — intending only to stay in New York for a few years.

That was almost three decades ago.

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Remembering Joe Pintauro, a Beloved Sag Harbor Playwright

“I hate to say it, but this cluster of people, it’s sort of the end of an era. These people that are between 85 and 95, there aren’t that many of them, when you think about it. There will be more to follow — more talented and creative people — but this was a group of really formidable artists. And extraordinarily influential. And Joe was one of them.”

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Bill King, 90, Remembered For Sharp Wit And Soaring Art

Scott Chaskey and his daughter, Rowenna, stood at the entrance of a rather unremarkable shed in the Northwest Woods last week, with dozens of soaring metal sculptures with long, slender legs peeking out.

They were artist Bill King as Mozart, Bill King as John Faddis, Bill King as Mary Magdalene. They were Bill King singing, dancing and holding hands with children. They were Bill King in the furthest stretches of his imagination — a magical place, his family and friends attest, filled with generosity, wit and the driest sense of humor, if it could even be typified as that.

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