Posts tagged sag harbor

‘You Feel Bad For Being Safe’: East End Rallies Around Ukrainian Community

At 12 years old, Vira Palamarchuk shouldn’t have a care in the world.

At 12 years old, she should not be tired, or sad, or worried. She should not be glued to the media, closely watching from over 4,600 miles away as Russia attacks Ukraine, her home country, where her father is fighting on the front lines.

At 12 years old, she should not be left to wonder whether he is alive or dead.

“It really is, like, you don’t want to even know what’s happening,” Vira said of the war from her home in Montauk. “I’m not on my phone anymore. I don’t look at the news anymore, because I don’t want to know. I just want to know if my family is okay and if my friends are okay. You see all those pictures and you don’t even want to …”

She paused, her voice hitching. “You feel bad for being safe,” she said. “That’s the feeling I get.”

Read More

Photographer Michael Heller Documents Africa Fire Mission’s Tireless Work In Kenya

Mathare is one of the oldest slums in Nairobi — home to over half a million people who live in a sea of mud-and-tin shanties, tightly packed into just 2 square miles. Survival is a daily struggle, set against a backdrop of poverty, disease, anarchy and violence, social complexities, and a lack of basic amenities, like sanitation, clean water, electricity and passable roads.

It is hard to imagine what would happen if a fire were to break out here — which is precisely what 20 firefighters and EMTs from the United States considered last November while touring the slum as part of their debriefing with Africa Fire Mission, a nonprofit organization that trains, empowers, supports and encourages fire departments in developing countries.

Among the firefighters was Michael Heller — an active member of the East Hampton Fire Department and a professional photographer whose work regularly appears in the Express News Group publications. He soaked in the atmosphere and conditions, noting the sewers running next to the shacks, the air heavy with the smell of burning and human waste.

“It gave us a sense of, ‘This is what the firefighters are having to deal with,’” he said, adding, “We were educated on what the odds are — and what they’re really dealing with when they try to go to a fire in these situations.”

Read More

Former Sag Harbor Family Raises Funds For Daughter Fighting Neurological Disorder

Bella Adlah is nothing short of a sweet, upbeat, 16-year-old girl — kind, giving and caring, with a wide, bright smile full of braces.

She loves drama, dance and singing, spending time with her friends and family, and exploring the outdoors. She even started a not-for-profit during the COVID-19 pandemic that delivered care packages to children in hospitals.

But that ground to a halt when she suddenly found herself in one, too — diagnosed with a neurological disorder that made it impossible for her to move, eat, speak, or see.

Read More

A Man Of Many Talents: Isaac Mizrahi Overcomes on Bay Street Stage

At 59 years old, Isaac Mizrahi has lived many lives — each of them, at their core, a combination of humor, personality and, of course, fashion.

Now a household name, the once-burgeoning designer established himself as a force in the fashion world with his 1988 runway debut, an explosion of color that cemented him as a man to watch — named “hottest new designer” by the New York Times.

He has dressed supermodels in couture, Broadway actors in elaborate costumes, and everyday women in his affordable clothing lines with Target and QVC. He’s sat as a judge on seven seasons of “Project Runway: All Stars,” written comic books, a memoir, and hosted a talk show.

He sings, acts and directs, and dabbles in comedy — all in the pursuit of his purpose, he said, which is to create, perform and inspire.

But nearly six decades later, it can still come with a heavy dose of imposter syndrome.

Read More

Linda Gronlund, Passenger On United Airlines Flight 93, Remembered As ‘Formidable’ 

Walking through the front door, Elsa Gronlund Griffin quickly flipped on the television, noting a smoldering field from a crashed plane on the screen, and continued toward the answering machine. The red light was blinking. She had three messages.

The first was from a friend. The second was from her mother, Doris Gronlund, just to say hello.

The third was her sister’s voice.

“Elsa, it’s Lin,” she started.

“Um. I only have a minute. I’m on United 93, and it’s been hijacked, uh, by terrorists who say they have a bomb.”

Read More

A ‘Hidden Child’: Erika Hecht Reflects On World War II in New Memoir

On the edge of Sag Harbor Village, Erika Hecht lives in a modest home surrounded by what she loves — books and art, colorful rugs, an eclectic mix of modern and antique furniture, a lovely backyard with towering trees.

“Wherever I am is my home,” she mused on Saturday morning. “It seems to me I’m carrying my home with me.”

It does not escape Hecht that this practice is a product of her childhood — rooted in a residual fear of loss, the danger and pain associated with forming attachments, only to have them ripped away in a moment.

And so, a collection of artifacts from her youth does not exist, the 87 year old explained, her voice still laced with a thick Hungarian accent. She was a “Hidden Child,” one of thousands of Jewish children who converted to Christianity in an attempt to survive World War II and skirt the Holocaust.

Read More

Burying Ground Preservation Group Finishes Restoring 22 Revolutionary War Monuments

Picture an eerie, centuries-old burying ground. The headstones are cracked and tilted, leaning at dangerous angles toward the grass. Lichen and mold inch up their sides. Names, dates and epitaphs carved into the stone, weathered by wind and rain, slowly fade back into time.

Many people assume graveyards are supposed to look like this — but the truth is, they’re not, explained historian Kurt Kahofer.

The retired Sag Harbor Elementary School teacher was guilty of that mindset, too, until he started working in burying grounds — restoring, cleaning, fixing and straightening headstones — and quickly realized he had it all wrong.

Read More

Temple Adas Israel Breaks Ground On Synagogue Renovation

In Judaism, the holiday Shavuot celebrates the Israelites receiving the Torah after trekking for seven weeks through the desert — an arduous journey from Egypt to Mount Sinai, as the tale goes.

And so, it was only appropriate, and complete happenstance, that the groundbreaking ceremony for Temple Adas Israel’s renovation — a project decades in the making — fell on the same day this year.

Dozens of congregants gathered under a tent outside of the Sag Harbor temple on Sunday morning — many for the first time since COVID-19 landed on the East End — to commemorate the start of a new era for the oldest synagogue on Long Island, standing since 1898 as a symbol of resilience, but now much in need of a renovation.

Read More

Lola, Beacon, Otto And Atticus: Sag Harbor Arts Community Embraces New Puppies

There are four new faces in town — puppy faces, that is.

First is Lola, a 3-month-old mini bernedoodle whose sass and sweetness match her name. Then, there’s Beacon, a defiant, 16-week-old cockapoo who loves attention and will stop at nothing to get it.

Otto, a mini Australian shepherd, is charming, smart and fearless at nearly 3 months old, consistently making eye contact under his expressive brows. And rounding out the quartet, also 3 months old, is Atticus, a confident, mostly chill mini bernedoodle with an adorable shock of white hair on top of his head.

And coincidentally, at almost exactly the same time, all four pups landed in the homes of prominent Sag Harbor arts figures, who just so happen to be friends.

Read More

Remembering A True Sag Harbor Character: Renowned Decoy Carver, Robert Hand Sr., Dies at 77

Every afternoon, like clockwork, Robert Hand Sr. could be found relaxing at his kitchen table in Sag Harbor, watching the birds through the window.

He knew them all. For the renowned decoy carver, they were his friends, his muses, his inspiration — and, in turn, he was their biggest fan.

But in recent weeks, the birds have gone without an audience. Mr. Hand died on January 11 after a cardiopulmonary arrest due to COVID-19 pneumonia at Stony Brook Southampton Hospital, according to his eldest son, Robert Hand Jr. He was 77.

Read More